Local antique stores lead Tennessee Antique Trail

Fayetteville antique dealers are among those who have led the way for antique centers in Tennessee.

Several local antique stores were some of the first antique stores to join TennesseeAntiqueTrail.com and were instrumental in making it a success. Tennessee AntiqueTrail also produces a brochure which is approved by the state of Tennessee.

The colorful brochure is distributed in tourist information centers and antique stores across Tennessee. An electronic copy of this brochure may be found on the website TennesseeAntiqueTrail.com. Over 120 antique shops are listed on the Tennessee trail and new shops are being added.

FayettevilleTnAntiqueTrail.com member stores were instrumental in the success in   

TennesseeAntiqueTrail.com, a part of AntiqueTrail.com, which has over 490 stores as members. The brochure was first published in July 2011 and the second annual brochure is currently being distributed.

The local stores listed on the trail are Bits & Pieces, located at 115 Market Street East, phone 659-9186; His & Hers Antiques, 213 Main Avenue South, phone 993-4838; Magnolia Antique Mall, 121 Main Avenue South, phone 433-9987; Sissy’s Antiques and Interiors, 208 Main Avenue South, phone 438-7169; and Touch of Glass Antiques, 217 Main Avenue South, phone 438-7020.

Following the FayettevilleTnAntiueTrail.com is an adventure in upscale antique galleries, as well as a mélange of privately owned shops and multi-vendor malls with a mixture of antiques and vintage collectibles.

Preview the shops before you “hit the trail” One may view the entire state map with the shops noted at each location or select one of the three divisions of the state or select shops by city name.

“I think it has helped business – it’s drawing people to look at pictures (on the website),” said Ray Landman, co-owner of Magnolia Mall with his wife, Hope.

He noted that people interested in a particular piece of furniture sometimes ask him to send a larger picture of the piece before they drive to Fayetteville.

These antique shops are housed uniquely. In Fayetteville, the 15,000-square-foot building that houses the Magnolia Mall was erected in 1890 by James & Alexander and at one time contained two store fronts. McKinney Bros. Drug Store was located there until 1923, and then it became Terry’s Department Store. The left side of the building was the home of O.A. Ready’s Bakery until 1952. Redford’s 5 & Dime was also located in the building.

Antique-aholics will need to visit the trail often because the merchandise changes frequently. Many items are from southern family estates. Occasionally, items are original pieces from antebellum homes. One may find primitives grandmother could have owned. European and Oriental imports, selected by local antique dealers while traveling abroad or brought here by early settlers, are also found on the trail.

The Tennessee Antique Trail offers glassware, pottery, signs, silver, porcelain, military items, books, art, coins historical paper and American, French, Japanese, Chinese and English furnishings from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.

Marcia Cole Arnold, born in Putnam County, is a collector of antiques and collectibles. She became frustrated with the limited and often outdated information on the internet. She decided she would solve that problem with a website using information obtained personally. Marcia and her husband, Ray, have visited hundreds of shops in the last several years. Bruce resides in Powell. Wendy Wayman, shop owner in Dickson, is also a sales associate.

The Tennessee Antique Trail offers not only antiques and collectibles, but most importantly, southern hospitality and charming, knowledgeable people.

For more information about TennesseeAntiqueTrail.com, visit the website or email Marcia@AntiqueTrail.com or call 256-797-5640. TennesseeAntiqueTrail.com is a member of AntiqueTrail.com which also includes AlabamaAntiqueTrail.com, FloridaAntiqueTrail.com, GeorgiaAntiqueTrail.com, MississippiAntiqueTrail.com and more.

Posted on Monday, September 10, 2012 at 5:06 pm