Goodman’s employees support Relay in a big way

Human Resource representatives for Goodman Manufacturing, Diane Tate (at left) and Sharon Taylor, model the front and back of T-shirts the Goodman employees’ Relay for Life Team is selling for the May 2 event. The T-shirts feature a “super heroes” slogan, in honor of Goodman’s cancer survivors. On the front of the T-shirts are “Super Heroes in the Fight Against Cancer — the Ultimate Test of Your Super Hero Powers”. The names of Goodman’s survivors are written on the back of the shirts. ~ Staff photo by Laurie Pearson

Human Resource representatives for Goodman Manufacturing, Diane Tate (at left) and Sharon Taylor, model the front and back of T-shirts the Goodman employees’ Relay for Life Team is selling for the May 2 event. The T-shirts feature a “super heroes” slogan, in honor of Goodman’s cancer survivors. On the front of the T-shirts are “Super Heroes in the Fight Against Cancer — the Ultimate Test of Your Super Hero Powers”. The names of Goodman’s survivors are written on the back of the shirts. ~ Staff photo by Laurie Pearson

LAURIE PEARSON

staff writer

Goodman Manufacturing is the 2014 Relay for Life’s Presenting Sponsor this year, and its employees began preparing for the upcoming event nearly a year ago with fundraising efforts.

This year the event, themed “Rock & Relay Around the Clock”, begins on Friday, May 2, on the Fayetteville Square with the Survivor’s Banquet at 6 p.m., sponsored by Goodman, and kickoff at 7 p.m.

Diane Tate and Sharon Taylor, two of Goodman’s Human Resources representatives, are part of Goodman’s Relay for Life team and talked about the employees’ involvement. Each year, HR gets the momentum going and then the employees take off with it.

Diane has been involved in Relay for Life about eight years total and Sharon about five years.

“We get a lot of support from our factory team,” Tate said.

Goodman workers take Relay for Life personally – there are about 35 active employees at the Fayetteville plant currently working who are cancer survivors. Included in that list is Taylor, who had cancer at the age of 39, went through chemotherapy and radiation and overcame the battle. She remained in remission until recently, when she was again diagnosed with cancer at age 52. She’s now preparing for her next fight.

Tate has been involved in the Relay for Life about eight years. She, too, takes it personally – her grandmother had breast cancer.

The Goodman team has been holding fundraisers every quarter. Bracelets, T-shirts, jewelry and baked goods are some of the items that have been sold with the baked goods being contributed by employees. Another event that’s been successful is a butterfly release, in honor of the survivors at Goodman. It has become such a popular event that this year they are expecting to release 100 butterflies.

“It has worked out really well,” said Tate.

So far this year, Goodman’s 1,700 employees have committed to donating over $20,000. Much of the money comes from voluntary payroll deductions. Tate figures they will probably hit $22,000 in funds by the time Relay is over. Each year, about 100 Goodman employees participate in the Relay for Life event. Already, nearly 60 employees have registered, but Tate anticipates many more will show up the night of the event.

T-shirt sales are expected to surge before Relay, and Goodman employees will have a booth where they will be selling snow cones, cotton candy, pizza, drinks, hot chocolate and some “31” products with the profit going to the American Cancer Society. The public is encouraged to show its support.

Posted on Friday, May 2, 2014 at 8:43 am